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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all - I am new to RVing and to QX80's/Armada's. Last month I purchased a sweet 2016 QX80 base with 75k on and yesterday I purchased a used 2008 Kampsite by Komfort M-23 travel trailer, with a box that is just short of 22 feet - including the tongue it's ~24 feet.

As far as I can tell, this trailer has a dry weight of ~4,300 lbs and a GVWR of 7,650 lbs. While I tried to do my homework prior to purchasing the trailer, I am now worried that it is too big. What do you guys think?

Payload rating on the QX80 is 1,460 lbs and the towing capacity is 8,500 lbs. I am using a weight distribution hitch (EAZ-lift). I towed it from the seller to our place (~50 miles, which included a ~7 mile steady ascent section (from ~800 ft to ~2,800 ft) and the rig seemed to be doing fine going 50-60 miles in 5th out of seven gears at ~3000-3500 rpms up that hill. The trailer was fairly level (I will probably drop the hitch ball by 2-3 inches next time). Felt a little heavy, but I have no reference point.

Going into this, I figured since the QX80 has a GVWR of ~7,500 lbs and a curb weight of ~5900 lbs, the payload should have been 1600 lbs (but listed as only 1,460 lbs on the sticker). With drivers+passengers estimated at ~700 lbs, this would leave 760-900 lbs for tongue + cargo in car (depending which payload value I use). I have no intent of filling the camper fully with water and hope to pack relatively lightweight inside the car and have a hard time believing I would ever reach the trailer's GVWR (7,650-4300 = 3,350 lbs), but still the 10-15% tongue weight requirements suggests that in the worst weight scenario, the actual wet weight of the trailer shouldn't be more than ~5,066 lbs (5066 * 0.15 = 760 lbs) and that's assuming no cargo in the car.

Glancing over this forum, it seems like people or towing considerable more with their Armada's/QX80's than that. What am I missing? I would be deeply appreciative of any insight.

Thanks,
TPP
 

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I think you are going to be just fine, especially considering what I'm pulling. My recommendations, 1) don't be in a hurry. 2) Drive it like you are driving a manual transmission and 3) if it downshift (or appears to) before you do, ensure it dropped a gear vs. just unlocking the torque converter. 2nd gear will be your best friend on the big long climbs. 2nd gear @3500 rpms will net you about 40 mph. It'll go faster but at what cost?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think you are going to be just fine, especially considering what I'm pulling. My recommendations, 1) don't be in a hurry. 2) Drive it like you are driving a manual transmission and 3) if it downshift (or appears to) before you do, ensure it dropped a gear vs. just unlocking the torque converter. 2nd gear will be your best friend on the big long climbs. 2nd gear @3500 rpms will net you about 40 mph. It'll go faster but at what cost?
Thank you. I greatly appreciate your response. I will take it easy and as someone who learned driving using stick, I innately found myself shifting manually when going up/down-hill.

Could you elaborate (or point me to a post) on the "torque converter" issue. I didn't come across that term previously.

Thanks,
Patrick
 

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On the torque converter, what will happen is when the transmission/engine (probably the ECU) senses a load it will do one of a number of things first of which as you "throttle up," the load sensed will cause the transmission to unlock the torque converter allowing the engine to make a bit more power through increased rpm. That's all well and good when you are not towing. It is however murder to your tyranny when you are towing because it causes the tyranny oil to heat up very rapidly. Faster than the cooler can cool it back down. Or... it will (if the load sensed is high enough) drop to the next lower gear. Sometimes it can be hard to differentiate so to be sure it didn't just unlock the torque converter, manually select down from the gear presently selected. Remember, transmissions are not smart, only automatic. They are preprogrammed more often than not for conditions other than towing. This holds true even when tow mode is selected. That mode simply changes shift points to a higher rpm when up shifting from a stop or slower speed. It does nothing for down shifting when descending grades. Again this is where it is very important to manually downshift.
 
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