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Can confirm. 2nd gen Armada. Disconnect harness to sensor on negative battery post results. Plugged in 13.2 volts at idle. Unplugged 14.5 volts at idle.

Question. I've never known it to be an issue. But does anyone see an issue with the battery receiving a constant 14.5V charge?
Or have there been any other issues by disabling the ECM controlled charging?

49462
 

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all of that has been confirmed in this thread already. :)

this also applies to other nissan models. :)

if you recall, the old "dumb way" of charging was directly from the alternator. doing this modification restores full control of battery charging to the voltage regulator inside the alternator.

this sensor tells the ECM to lower (or raise as needed) the voltage for emission purposes and such. with the sensor gone, the alternator will lower the voltage once IT sees the battery is fully charged, which is how our cars did in the olden days. :)
 

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The other wires on the battery current sensor pigtail are for the battery temperature sensor that is built into the battery current sensor module. These wires should not be cut, disconnected, nor do you remove the plug entirely. Unlike the signal wire for the ECM to determine when to have the alternator charging or not, those wires for the battery temperature sensor reads the ambient temp surrounding the battery. The temp readings--->ECM--->voltage regulator--->increases/decreases voltage.
 

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The other wires on the battery current sensor pigtail are for the battery temperature sensor that is built into the battery current sensor module. These wires should not be cut, disconnected, nor do you remove the plug entirely. Unlike the signal wire for the ECM to determine when to have the alternator charging or not, those wires for the battery temperature sensor reads the ambient temp surrounding the battery. The temp readings--->ECM--->voltage regulator--->increases/decreases voltage.
Wouldn't the alternator just charge accurately based on the voltage regulator?
Plenty of vehicles do not have a battery temperature sensor.

Regardless, on a 2nd gen Armada what wires are specifically for the current sensor and which are for the temp sensor? Someone mentioned a blue wire, there is not a blue wire.

This is the exact reason I asked for detail and confirmation, there is contradicting information in this thread.
 

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The blue signal wire mentioned is the signal wire on the battery current sensor for the Z62s. I've always said this may or may not be the specific color depending on year or chassis code and that its always best to check using a multi-meter. Since you've just clarified there is no blue wire on your Y62, the best way to check which is the signal wire is with a multi-meter. Of course, having a service manual for your specific year-Y62 will make it even easier. But if a service manual isn't available, with the pigtail disconnected from the battery current sensor and the truck switched to Ignition, probe each wire. One will have an output of at least 5V and that will be the wire. There is also another method that some Infiniti owners have reported where the dealership/tech de-pins the ground/signal wire from the ECM. I'm sure that can be done on the Y62 but a service manual is definitely needed in order to know which connector and pin location that would be.
 

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The blue signal wire mentioned is the signal wire on the battery current sensor for the Z62s. I've always said this may or may not be the specific color depending on year or chassis code and that its always best to check using a multi-meter. Since you've just clarified there is no blue wire on your Y62, the best way to check which is the signal wire is with a multi-meter. Of course, having a service manual for your specific year-Y62 will make it even easier. But if a service manual isn't available, with the pigtail disconnected from the battery current sensor and the truck switched to Ignition, probe each wire. One will have an output of at least 5V and that will be the wire. There is also another method that some Infiniti owners have reported where the dealership/tech de-pins the ground/signal wire from the ECM. I'm sure that can be done on the Y62 but a service manual is definitely needed in order to know which connector and pin location that would be.
Thank you.
And just to clarify. There are 4 possible wires. But with the ignition on, only 1 of those wires will have 5V, that is the wire that needs to be snipped?

Thanks.
 

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Yes, that one particular signal wire would be reading at least 5V. When I did this mod 3 years ago, I removed the battery and battery tray. Since we have yearly emissions in NYC/NYS, I spliced in heat-shrunk bullet connectors. Before bringing my truck in, I reconnect the wire and the DTCs for the battery current sensor are gone. Once inspections are done, disconnect and back to a happy 14V.
 
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It doesn’t trigger the CEL on the dash so no annoying light to worry about. Only when a diagnostic tool is plugged in, it’ll show on the tool.
 

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Yes, that one particular signal wire would be reading at least 5V. When I did this mod 3 years ago, I removed the battery and battery tray. Since we have yearly emissions in NYC/NYS, I spliced in heat-shrunk bullet connectors. Before bringing my truck in, I reconnect the wire and the DTCs for the battery current sensor are gone. Once inspections are done, disconnect and back to a happy 14V.
New development. I got around to probing that harness tonight. 2 of the 4 pins show 5v exactly with the ignition on (engine off).

2 pins show nothing. 2 pins are 5v to ground.

I'm left guessing again or looking for another solution. Any ideas.

2018 Armada.

P.S.
A thought I just had.
It has been mentioned to not just unplug the sensor entirely because it is also the temp sensor to protect the battery.
What if I removed the sensor from the negative cable, ziptied it off to the side, and left the harness plugged in?
This would still measure the temperature around the battery, but it wouldn't provide any voltage reading.
This would also prevent a DTC since no wires would be cut and the harness would remain plugged in.
Thoughts?
 

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Broke it down into a 6 step layout for those that can follow this form easier:

1) Take the tie wrap off the sensor.

2) Slide the sensor (black plastic circular thing with a plug on the bottom/side/back containing three wires that runs into a wire tube, then back to the IPDM) out of the way.

3) Take a piece of tin foil 4" x 5"wide and wrap it around the negative battery cable, centered where you will move the sensor back to when finished.

4) Once you have the tin foil wrapped, cover it with a layer of electrical tape, one piece thick.

5) Slide the sensor back to center over the tin foil and re-tie wrap it in place (It will now shield the negative battery cable and make the sensor think that it's reading less voltage than actual and tell the system to raise the minimal acceptable charge level to - in my case 13.4 volts- up from 12.1. ).

6) Adding more tin foil results in higher charge levels, higher battery voltage.
Finally got around to doing this myself. Not sure how you are supposed to get more than a 5" x 4" sheet of tin foil through that sensor wrapped in electrical tape. I wound as tight as I could and still only managed to get it back up about 1/3rd the wrapped section. Not even sure I needed to replace the tie-wrap but I did anyway.

Here's what it looks like:

49566
hole
 

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Finally got around to doing this myself. Not sure how you are supposed to get more than a 5" x 4" sheet of tin foil through that sensor wrapped in electrical tape. I wound as tight as I could and still only managed to get it back up about 1/3rd the wrapped section. Not even sure I needed to replace the tie-wrap but I did anyway.

Here's what it looks like:

View attachment 49566 hole
I'm replacing that Negitave cable with 1GA on both Armadas hope it helps out with electrical woes. My next step in upgrading my grounding system
 

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Can confirm. 2nd gen Armada. Disconnect harness to sensor on negative battery post results. Plugged in 13.2 volts at idle. Unplugged 14.5 volts at idle.

Question. I've never known it to be an issue. But does anyone see an issue with the battery receiving a constant 14.5V charge?
Or have there been any other issues by disabling the ECM controlled charging?

View attachment 49462
Howdy, 2019 Armada here with basically the same plug. I'm wondering if ya just wrapped the negative cable in foil, if it would accomplish the same thing?
 

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long story but answers a few questions that nissan can't.
I spent hours on the phone with nissan local and nissan north America with their answers to questions limited to -we can't- they can't-it won't-uh huh- and so sorry- then I got into the books and tools.

As we all know, the Armadas leak voltage like water through a sieve. I have been attempting to train the local stealership about the charging system. First problem identified is that Nissan has not updated their maintenance computer system for the Armada since 2006. Their current maintenance, parts, and service computers show a revision date of 2012 but contain all the 2006 images. So if you are looking for a current electrical system diagram for the Armada, don't bother looking for it, it's not there. However, the Titan crowd has found a way to apply leverage and most of the updated diagrams, to include the IPDM for the 2007-2010 Armada are on the Titan service system.

That being said, I went to replace the ECM relay on my 07's IPDM. Checked with Nissan Parts, Service, and Mechanics computer systems, got the diagram and the relay, per their instruction- only problem is the 2007-2010 has no ECM relay on the IPDM... It's included in the IPDM. The voltage regulator that we old farts all knew and loved, because it was easy to understand, manipulate, repair, adjust, is now included in the IPDM of 2010-2010. It's results go to the ECU which then controls the alternator output.

Reason this is interesting. The charging system is based on some really odd really old designs with modern adaptations. The ECU, which controls the charging rate, voltage, and amps, receives it's information from the IC regulator/electrical feedback sensor (the circular thing on the negative battery cable located about 6" down the line from the battery terminal.) it's the size of a 5 peso coin. Basically, it's a magnetic field sensor the exact same as what you run over at a stop light. The signal generated tells the ECU to tell the alternator how much and how hard to charge, ostensibly so that the alternator doesn't constantly charge, in order to save gas. But the field sensor/ic regulator/ feedback sensor routes through the IPDM. So here's what we start with.

You have basic battery voltage that isn't measured, but is indicated. You have basic battery amperage available, which isn't measured. Then you have running car voltage which is measured and compared to a reference voltage programmed into the IPDM and the ECU which sounds normal. But the reference voltage is programmed in as 12.1 volts (read from the OBDII port) So first problem is, the battery is fully charged anywhere from 12.4 volts for a factory new nissan overpriced lead acid battery to 13.2 volts for a top of the line AGM battery. So your charging system will never fully charge your battery. Next, with a battery of 13.2 volts, and OBDII port voltage indicated as 12.2 volts, and a dash gauge indication of 11.2 volts, you have three different inputs going to the IPDM and the ECU. Computers can't handle conflict. Now remember the voltage leaks we all have?

Well they come into play after the battery reference voltage of 12.1 comes into play. So the gauge may say you have 12.2 volts available, which is one needles width below center/half scale on the dash gauge, but you may only have 11.2 at the battery. 11.2 will generate all sorts of flashing dash lights, anti lock problems, transmission shifting problems, 4whl drive selector problems, traction control problems, etc.

If you have low voltage but have a system that doesn't leak voltage too badly or have an alternator that starts charging immediately, you should see a dash voltage needle position 1/8" to the right of center instantly after start up. If the charge catches up with the system before the system reacts to the low voltage, you may not know you have a problem.

The center line position on the dash voltage gauge is 13 volts. You should always see a voltage indication to the right of the center line. When you turn the car on, but don't start it, you should see a voltage indication with the needle on the dash gauge no more than one needle width to the left of center. If you have a super AGM battery, resting voltage will be with the needle touching the centerline on the gauge. So, we have an ECU and IDPM with all slots that can be programmed, programmed in with a 100% charge/voltage reference of 12.1. Nissan has no way of measuring or determining any of these parameters at the dealership level maintenance facilities. Of course, you also have to remember that Nissan has no maintenance facilities anywhere in the U.S. the maintenance facilities at the dealership are sub sub contracted companies who supply nissan with trained mechanics. Therein lies another problem. None of the nissan trained mechanics anywhere are taught how to repair the vehicle. They are simply taught how to swap parts. They have no diagnostic capability for anything. They have trouble shooting checklists that say if the car does X check Y, if Y isn't at X level, replace part Z. So if you have CV joints that are all clunking and can be moved by hand, nissan considers them to be OK and will not replace them until they physically break apart. If you have bad universals, they won't replace the universals, they replace the whole driveshaft unit. If your charging system is faulty or the factory programming in the IPDM or ECU is bad, they only know to swap parts and not fix anything.

So if your charging system needles swings correctly but doesn't charge your battery to the correct level. If your OBDII port shows a voltage one or two volts down from what the battery actually has. And everything appears to work correctly but not produce the desired results (fully charged battery) (no flashing dash lights) (correctly working antilock and traction control systems) then you have to figure a way to lie to the charging system to make it think it needs to do more, in order to get the correct results.

The IC regulator is temperature sensitive as cold makes wire flow voltage better, hot slows voltage down/decreases it. The connector into the sensor has three wires which are crimped and not soldered, then plugged together. Soldered or solid continuous wire is impervious to water, vibration, dust, temperature, etc. Crimps are not. Nissan has no way of diagnosing or checking the IC regulator/voltage feedback sensor. If you say it's bad, nissan can only replace the whole negative battery cable instead of replacing the 5 cent sensor loop. So- how do we get around this?

Fool the sensor! Take the tie wrap off the sensor, slide the sensor (black plastic circular thing with a plug on the bottom/side/back containing three wires that runs into a wire tube, then back to the IPDM) out of the way, take a piece of tin foil 4" x 5"wide and wrap it around the negative battery cable, centered where you will move the sensor back to when finished. Once you have the tin foil wrapped, cover it with a layer of electrical tape, one piece thick. Slide the sensor back to center over the tin foil and re-tie wrap it in place. It will now shield the negative battery cable and make the sensor think that it's reading less voltage than actual and tell the system to raise the minimal acceptable charge level to - in my case 13.4 volts- up from 12.1. More tin foil, higher charge levels, higher battery voltage. So far, 28 degrees up to 80 degrees no longer affects the output. Hours on the freeway at 80 degrees or hours on the freeway at 29 degrees make no difference. The click and return to zero charge is gone. And if I let the car sit a week, when it starts, it immediately charges at 14.2 volts, dropping as the battery re-energizes stopping at a charge level of 13.9 when cold or 13.4 when hot.

On my AGM 13.2 volt battery, resting voltage has gone from 12.2 volts (11.1 volts on a new nissan battery) before the fix up to 12.9-13.2 volts after the fix.-where it's supposed to be- It's cheap, easy, and allows you to manipulate the voltage as you watch so you can check the rest of the systems performance as well.
This huge...

Thanks so much for posting this additional info!

I am going to do this...

I need to find the other threads on this forum regarding how to measure for voltage drops / loss so I can baseline my system before changes.

One other question: can you recommend a grounding cable kit and do you know if the FSM identifies all of the grounding locations? (Note that I will follow your advice to solder all connections)

I think I saw a post somewhere that said that Nissan recalled 2008 Armadas for grounding issues..

Thx
I have 2019 Armada and why not just Un bolt the sensor from the negative terminal. Wouldn’t this give you old school alternator charging. Not stopping charge on quick take offs and charging Immediately not waiting for 8 miles down the road to start.
 
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