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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, let me say thanks - I've used this forum to fix a few problems, including swapping the rear air leveling system for normal shock and springs. I'm a fairly competent mechanic, but it's nice to have the answers to the test before I start tearing the truck apart.

I have a torn boot on one of my rear cv axles. I've been googling and it seems to be a pretty uncommon problem.

It seems like there are tons of axle repair kits out there, but not many whole CV axles online. However, I've always heard repairing a CV boot is a fool's errand.

Has anyone dealt with this problem, and if so what did you?

Also, on the Land Rover forums there are a few guys who buy old trucks and part them out, and they specialize in Land Rovers. Does anyone do that for Armadas?
 

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Yeah, i wouldn't mess around changing the boot, just get a whole new half shaft. They are very affordable + the peace of mind.
 

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Another vote for replacing the whole thing. Unless you recently tore the boot there is probably a bunch of crud in there that'll ruin the joint quickly. I don't know how much the rear costs but I bought a front one in the last year and it was $90-100. For that little money I would just want to do the job once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, the cheapest I have found so far is $350! It appears that OEM is the only option.

That said, I'm definitely planning to replace it even if it is spendy.
 

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If you have another rig and this one can be down for a day or 3 pull the cv axle out and take it in to someone local and see how they feel about rebuilding it. They will probably look at it for less than a minute and say yay or nay and give you a cost on the rebuild. If they are anywhere near approaching half the price of OEM just go that route.

That's what I'd do anyway.
 

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Huh, I just did a parts search online for rear cv shafts and yeah, nowhere to be found...weird!

I checked ebay and they have used ones on there if you wanted to go that route but you really don't know the condition of them.
So yeah, I'd do what Highbrow said and check your local area for a rebuilder and see what they say.

Good luck and let us know what you find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So after extensive googling and searching the common parts stores online, I bought a new one off ebay for $350 plus expedited shipping.

I have two problems - I work a lot and don't have much time to run down parts, but I need to get this up and running by next Monday. So I might have been able to get a slightly better price, but I don't really have the time to devote to it. The idea of having it rebuilt is very solid - I didn't know that was an option. But when I started looking around my area I didn't see any places who rebuilt them that were fairly close by.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I got that axle installed today. I figured I'd write up some tips since I couldn't find online where anyone else has done this. For me, it was one of those jobs that on paper looks like it will take and hour or two, but due to the tight space and some user error it instead took four hours.

The only symptom was a couple of clicks when I passed 30 mph. I initially thought it was at the front, but eventually decided it was from the rear. They do sound like CV clicks, but because my truck is 2WD I wasn't expecting a failed CV joint, and because they stop so quickly it didn't immediately sound like a failing CV axle. Also, very quickly the sound changed into a single click passing 30 mph, and stayed that way until I got it back home. Once home, I looked at the axle and sure enough the inner boot was almost gone and a lot of grease was spread under the truck around the axle.

First - SAFETY! Chock the wheels, use the e-brake, use jack stands.

I followed the directions from the factory manual - the process is you pull the wheel, pull the cotter pin, (make sure the e-brake is on) and loosen the big nut on the end of the shaft. Critical: Remove the stabilizer bar clamp or it's impossible to get the shaft out. To do this you have to compress the axle spring with a jack to take tension off the stabilizer bar. Then remove the 6 bolts securing the axle to the diff and bang the axle out the back with a hammer. Also, note that you do not have to remove the caliper or brake disc, which I stupidly did, because I didn't read the directions closely enough and because it's required on my Land Rover and I confused the two.

It's a pain to get it out. It involves a lot of wiggling and cursing. Although much of that time was before I realized I forgot to remove the stabilizer bar clamp, so maybe it's not all that bad.

After about 30 mins of wrangling, the only way I could get it in was to go over the diff and drop it in to place. To do that, I got the flanged end started in the hub, then flexed the inner CV joint so it would drop in to place. If you seat the flanged end too deeply, you can't flex the inner joint and it won't drop in. The are a couple of millimeters to spare here, so it's very tight. BTW, I think it's pretty much required that you remove the spare tire. I don't think it's possible to get the axle back in with the spare in place. I also removed the brace that holds the spare tire in place to get a bit more space to work.

Once it's in, it's fairly straightforward to tighten the 6 inner bolts back up. 87 ft-lbs is no joke, but not bad if you rotate the axle so the bolts you are torquing are at the bottom. I weigh about 175, so I "torqued" the big outer nut to ~170 ft-lbs by standing on my breaker bar about a foot from the nut.

NOTE: the 6 bolts that secure the axle to the diff are supposed to be replaced, not reused. I didn't see this until too late, so I may buy some and replace them later, which is possible without disassembling anything if you rotate the shaft while you loosen them.
 

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Once it's in, it's fairly straightforward to tighten the 6 inner bolts back up. 87 ft-lbs is no joke, but not bad if you rotate the axle so the bolts you are torquing are at the bottom. I weigh about 175, so I "torqued" the big outer nut to ~170 ft-lbs by standing on my breaker bar about a foot from the nut.

Do you have the actual torque spec. for the axle nut? The 2005 Armada manual is missing the info for the the IRS Armada, and instead shows the graphics and text for the 2005 Titan solid axle replacement procedure.

Thanks.
 

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First, let me say thanks - I've used this forum to fix a few problems, including swapping the rear air leveling system for normal shock and springs. I'm a fairly competent mechanic, but it's nice to have the answers to the test before I start tearing the truck apart.

I have a torn boot on one of my rear cv axles. I've been googling and it seems to be a pretty uncommon problem.

It seems like there are tons of axle repair kits out there, but not many whole CV axles online. However, I've always heard repairing a CV boot is a fool's errand.

Has anyone dealt with this problem, and if so what did you?

Also, on the Land Rover forums there are a few guys who buy old trucks and part them out, and they specialize in Land Rovers. Does anyone do that for Armadas?
I have a 2012 Nissan Armada Platinum,the air shocks went bad so I thought I would do away with the air suspension and just put a regular suspension on it.I ordered the so called conversion kit for it do do away with the air shocks,which included a coil spring and a cheap gas shock.After installing those items the suspension wasn’t any better because it still sagged in the rear.I was wondering did your Armada do the same thing and if not what did you do to get it to not sag.
 
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