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Just finished a 950 mile towing with our 2019 Armada. Prior to starting, installed the APS from Fusion to monitor Tranny Temp. and gear selection.
Towing on the mountain passes of Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona with outside Temps. low of 60 degrees to a high of 78 degrees. Found average low Tranny Temp. to be 187 degrees, average high to be 192 degrees. When pulling some mountain passes with high traffic, outside Temp. 80 degrees speed around 45 MPH saw intermittent Temp. 205 degrees until speed picked up to around 60 MPH.
Trailer weight 4,300 lbs. with 1,000 lbs. of added weight. Armada load of 600 lbs. and two passengers around 280 lbs. All towing in Tow Mode. Found Tranny would shift a lot more than I expected. Would stay in 7th. gear only on level roads at 65 MPH. Pulling any grades it would shift as low as 4th gear to maintain set speed. Most of the miles were driven with the cruise control on. Gas mileage a low of 8.2 to 12.4 during this trip.

Now having some idea of what to expect from this vehicle I have some questions. Having read about owners switching to an after market Tranny. cooler what are the results. Was the Tranny temperature monitored with OEM cooler prior to switching to an aftermarket cooler ? If so what were the results ? This model of Armada came with 18 inch wheels. Has anyone switched to 20 inch wheels ? Will they fit ?

Appreciate any input.
 

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Lot of good info here - thanks for posting.

I am not sure if anyone is putting aftermarket coolers in new 2019 models yet. You have some good baseline data here that may help others decide.

I have an 06 and put in the aftermarket tranny cooler to bypass the one built into the bottom of the radiator. That is because the tranny cooler part sometimes cracks and allows tranny fluid to mix with coolant which is not good. I was not really looking for extra cooling - I don't tow that much. I did not record temps before and after but just going by the dash gauge it is cooler than it was - maybe too cold in the winter. I plan to use my IR gun to check the temp in various places at various outdoor temps this winter.

You have a different truck so I am not even sure the 2019 radiator has the tranny cooler in it. I would not worry about an aftermarket cooler unless those temps you recorded are too high for you.
 

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I wondered if having an after market cooler would be a problem in cold weather. Not being able to receive warm coolant from the radiator. Maybe someone else will respond with their experience.

Thanks
 

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The tranny definitely takes longer to warm up with the stock radiator bypassed. The engine coolant contact also helped warm the tranny fluid up to temp.

This morning it was 20 degrees F here. I warmed up the Armada in the driveway for 5 minute and then drove my kid to school through 20-40 mph streets. The engine was already about at temp at 5 minutes, the heat was just starting to blow. It took 10 minutes of driving before the tranny temp gauge got up the the C line. 5 minutes later it was up to normal operating temp - which for me is about 1/4-1/3rd of the way up from C.

I can certainly feel the difference between a cold and warm tranny. I think once it gets up to temp it is fine - it just takes longer.

Last winter I had a 2 hour, 70-75 mph, highway trip in 0 degrees F and the tranny temp gauge was pegged to the bottom. As soon as I got off the highway the gauge climbed back towards normal.

As far as I understand - heat is a transmission's worst enemy (beside no fluid and teenagers) - but there is an ideal operating temperature too. I've been thinking about some add-on after market tranny warmer but I'd probably want to add a tranny temp gauge first, so I know what I am dealing with. For now I am just going to make some mental notes and take some IR gun readings. I may also play around with some cardboard over the external cooler.
 

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The tranny definitely takes longer to warm up with the stock radiator bypassed. The engine coolant contact also helped warm the tranny fluid up to temp.

This morning it was 20 degrees F here. I warmed up the Armada in the driveway for 5 minute and then drove my kid to school through 20-40 mph streets. The engine was already about at temp at 5 minutes, the heat was just starting to blow. It took 10 minutes of driving before the tranny temp gauge got up the the C line. 5 minutes later it was up to normal operating temp - which for me is about 1/4-1/3rd of the way up from C.

I can certainly feel the difference between a cold and warm tranny. I think once it gets up to temp it is fine - it just takes longer.

Last winter I had a 2 hour, 70-75 mph, highway trip in 0 degrees F and the tranny temp gauge was pegged to the bottom. As soon as I got off the highway the gauge climbed back towards normal.

As far as I understand - heat is a transmission's worst enemy (beside no fluid and teenagers) - but there is an ideal operating temperature too. I've been thinking about some add-on after market tranny warmer but I'd probably want to add a tranny temp gauge first, so I know what I am dealing with. For now I am just going to make some mental notes and take some IR gun readings. I may also play around with some cardboard over the external cooler.
Appreciate your update on the Tranny cooling. Let us know of any information you find.
 
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